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GENERAL LYMAN WARD

 

BASIC FACTS:

Date of Birth: None

Place born: None

Death: None

Where died: None

Where buried: None

Father's name: None

Mother's name: None

 

 

BRIEF HISTORY PRIOR TO CIVIL WAR:

 

 

BRIEF HISTORY DURING THE CIVIL WAR:

Helped organized 1st Wisconsin Regiment

1862 enlisted as a private

Received field promotions to General

Lyman M. Ward went out from Fond du Lac in the first company of the first Regiment of Wisconsin Volunteers. He was the author of "Dodge of the Big Ones"

After serving with the original First, colonel Ward, as he was familiarly known, helped to organize, and from the beginning to the end, was identified with the 14th Regiment. At Pittsburg Landing, notwithstanding the terrors and disasters of the first day's fight, the 14th absolutely refused to break or run. Their splendid behavior won for them the title, "Fourteenth Wisconsin Regulars." Three times during the second day they charged and captured a rebel battery and each time for want of proper support were compelled to let go their prize. Most every one has heard in one shape or another the story of the officer who told his men they might dodge "the big ones," but few are acquainted with the real incident which gave it origin.

While forming the line for the fourth charge, this regiment drew the concentrated fire of all the enemy's guns within range. Shell, grape, and solid shot swept over and about them with shriek, hiss, and roar, which only one who has been there can appreciate. The colonel passed along, cautioning the men to stand steady, assured them that they had that day made their names immortal, to keep their ranks solid, that a man was as apt to dodge in front of a bullet as to avoid it, and that another hour would surely give them the victory. Just then a perfect tornado of iron and lead swept over their heads. Every man and office involuntarily dodged, when Lieutenant Ed. Ferris said: "But Colonel, when they shoot a cooking stove right past a man's ear, can't he dodge just a little?"

"Well, yes" said the Colonel, "if it's a big one, dodge just a little, about as much as I did."

Five minutes later the regiment again went for that battery and never let go of it. As a trophy of that day's service, the government assigned one of the capture guns to the state and now it is now at Madison.

 

BRIEF HISTORY AFTER THE CIVIL WAR:

 

 

 

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